Amazon sets tougher rules for its delivery service partners’ employees

By Nikita Chaurasia  Date: 2021-05-07

Amazon sets tougher rules for its delivery service partners’ employees

Amazon is known for closely managing its staff and contractors, and it also seeks to control the employees of the companies in which it works. Reportedly, the company has updated its policies for Amazon’s delivery partners wherein it lays out directives for the employees regarding personal hygiene and social media etiquette.

The norms govern anything from the appearance of a delivery person (clean hair, fingernails, ears, and teeth) to how they smell (no body odor, bad breath, or immodest perfume), sources cited.

The policies apply to drivers who work for small, independent companies contracted by Amazon through its Delivery Service Partners program. However, this has not kept the corporation from dictating the condition of their fingernails, among other things.

These drivers are also affected by the retail giant’s AI-powered cameras. If drivers choose to work (or keep working) for the retail giant, they must agree to always-on cameras monitoring them for incidents like traffic violations or careless driving.

The company is famous for not giving its workers (or those who work under its umbrella) much freedom with their personal lives. Several warehouse employees must micromanage their time away from work to avoid getting fired.

Amazon's management, including Jeff Bezos, said that the company does not treat its workers like robots, though it is difficult to believe that with such regulations set for drivers who are not contractors.

Legal experts argue that by exerting more control over these jobs, the organization has put itself in jeopardy. Amazon has opted not to directly hire DSP drivers, a decision that protects the company from the costs and risks associated with the job.

Amazon's growing clout on its delivery partners but can persuade courts and government authorities that the business is a vicariously liable party or joint employer to avoid any dispute arising from the policies it has set.

Source Credit –

https://www.theverge.com/2021/5/5/22421327/amazon-drivers-delivery-service-partner-rules-grooming-online-conduct

About Author

Nikita Chaurasia     aeresearch.net

Nikita Chaurasia

An accomplished professional in the field of content development, playing with words comes naturally to Nikita Chaurasia. After completing her post-graduate MBA degree in Advertising and PR, Nikita worked across numerous content-driven verticals, undertaking diverse r...

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